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LIMNOLOGY

Our Limnology Program focuses on the study and conservation of freshwater ecosystems, specifically rivers and streams. Through a range of projects, we conduct comprehensive habitat typing surveys to assess the ecological characteristics and biodiversity of these aquatic environments. Additionally, we implement innovative initiatives such as large-woody complexity installation, boulder weir installation, and off-channel pond creation to enhance habitat diversity and provide refuge for aquatic species. By combining scientific research, data analysis, and collaborative efforts with local stakeholders, our program strives to protect and restore the health of freshwater ecosystems, ensuring the long-term sustainability of these vital natural resources.

PROJECTS:

Off-channel Ponds: The purpose of Off-channel ponds is to provide thermal refugial habitat for summer rearing and velocity refugial habitat for over-wintering such that the capacity and productivity of tributary habitat is increased.

Large Woody Complexity: Projects are designed to mimic natural stream conditions that produce shelter for rearing salmonids through the use of locally sourced tree trunks, root-wads and brush bundles.

Fish passage improvement: Projects include improvements to road crossings through the installation of a rock ford and improvements to diversions structures through the installation of a series of boulder weirs.

Filter by Program
Year
Title
Format
Description
Image
Author
Publisher
Pages
New Field
01/02/1956
French Creek Reference - Supplmental Report on Water Supply and Use of Water on French Creek Stream System - Siskiyou County
PDF
State of California Department of Public Works
63
01/03/1967
Post-1964 Stream bank Protection Study
PDF
Due to steep erodible banks in which the stream is entrenched for a large part of its course through the valley, erosion of its banks with the resultant loss of agricultural lands is a continuous process.
SRCD
10
01/09/1971
Watershed Investigation Report on Kidder Creek
PDF
Kidder Creek Watershed Potential Public Law 556 Study
Unknown
SRCD
20
01/01/1976
Evaluation of Habits Resulting from Streambank Protection Projects In Siskiyou and Mendocino Counties
PDF
In 1975 biologists from the Soil Conservation District and CDFW analyzed 7 projects.
David Patterson
SRCD
15
01/01/1988
Steelhead Spawner Escapement and Habitat Utilization in Selected Scott River Tributaries 1998
PDF
Monitoring steelhead spawner escapement in upper Klamath River basin tributaries is essential to determine the relative contribution of these systems to total estimated escapement of the Klamath River. Escapement into three tributaries has been monitored annually since 1983. The principal objective of this work is to determine habitat use rates so conclusions may be drawn relative to the efficiency of instream habitat restoration techniques. Continuation (possibly expansion) of this work is critical to prove or disprove success of the habitat restoration and enhancement program on the ranger district. Results may aid in securing future funding for habitat work as well as help direct habitat prescriptions and prevent prescription errors. Knowledge about the relative contribution of tributary systems to overall production can be helpful in addressing difficult land management situations. This information paper is not intended to be all-encompassing, because it does not provide answers to many other significant habitat related questions (eg: what is the condition of rearing habitat). However it should be viewed as a first step in a direction which may result in better steelhead management and more informed resource management decisions.
John R. West
USFW
6
31/12/1989
EVALUATION OF FISH HABITAT CONDITION AND UTILIZATION IN SALMON, SCOTT, SHASTA, AND MID-KLAMATH SUB-BASIN TRIBUTARIES 1988/1989
PDF
This report summarizes field work completed between October 1,1988 and September 30, 1989 under interagency agreement (#14-16-001- 89508) between the U.S. Department of Agriculture and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. About $148,300 in USFWS funds was expended on salaries, transportation, and equipment. An additional $46,000 in biologist salaries, overhead, and office equipment was contributed to the project by USDA Forest Service, Klamath National Forest. Expenditures are summarized in Appendix N. The principle objective of field work was to identify existing salmonid spawning and rearing habitat condition and use in eleven streams located in Salmon, Scott, Shasta, and Mid-Klamath sub-basins. The project focuses on habitat conditions encountered during summer base-flow period, however habitat limitations for other periods are described. Crews completed physical habitat assessments and biological surveys for 208 km (125 mi) of streams.
J.R.West, O.J.Dix, A.D.Olson, M.V.Anderson, S.A.Fox, and J.H.Power
USFS
268
01/11/1990
SCOTT RIVER WATERSHED GRANITIC SEDIMENT STUDY
PDF
2008-2009 Season
Sari Sommarstrom
SRCD
175
01/10/1991
Scott River Flow & Augmentation Study
PDF
Cursory level investigation into increasing summer fishery flows in the Scott Valley, CA.
Various
DWR
134
01/07/1992
Scott River Riparian Zone Inventory and Evaluation
PDF
The factual materials contained in this report are from data collected by actual measurement and observation along the banks of Scott River during August - September 1991. The scope of the work included the inventory and evaluation of the riparian system on 29.70 miles on the left bank and 29.57 miles on the right bank. The observed areas include the following needs: 1. Livestock exclusion (with fenced drinking access) 2. Fencing - new construction, maintenance, or rebuild 3. Planting and irrigating to establish riparian vegetation 4. Flood irrigation water filter control 5. Streambank protection with large rock 6. Off-stream livestock watering (well and tank) 7. Fire protection. There were 373 identified sites with 182 on the left bank and 191 on the right bank. Different site determinations included the following criteria: 1. fenced or not fenced 2. livestock access 3. livestock exclusion 4. bank protection with large rock or not protected 5. dominant species age 6. change in crown density species or percentage of crown density, 7. percentage or diversity of understory cover 8. property ownership boundary. Also, determination of bank swallow habitat on two sites (#126 and #166) and understory "species of concern" on 26 sites was done. With the available data and proposed prescriptions for restoration and maintenance of the riparian system, the landowners were contacted. The information was reviewed and each landowner and/or agent was asked to rate their willingness to perform the practices recommended.
Alvin G. Lewis
SRCD
107
31/03/1993
Scott River Streambank Protection, Riparian Fencing & Planting - Black Ranch
PDF
Rip rap, riparian fencing and planting project proposed by the SRCD.
Gena Evans
SRCD
22
01/11/1993
Scott River Streambank Stabilization Project
PDF
Rip rap project proposal responses.
Carl Harral
CDFW
24
28/02/1994
Letter to Alvin Lewis - 1994
PDF
Letter from concerned citizen regarding the Rip rap project proposal. Klamath Forest Alliance.
Felice Pace
KFA
12
25/04/1996
Scott Valley Trib Report 1996
PDF
Objectives for streambank stabilization in the Scott Valley.
Various
NRCS, SRCD
8
01/09/1996
Temperature Monitoring on the Scott River Phase I 1995
PDF
This project utilized Onset Hobo Temp electronic units to monitor water temperatures at selected sites on Scott River, in the Scott Valley (confluence of East Fork Scott River and South Fork Scott River to river mile 22). Data was collected at various sites beginning in January 1995 and extended through September 1995. Graphs were compiled from data sets for comparison of water temperatures at these various sites.
Al Molitor
SRCD
25
01/02/1998
Temperature Monitoring on the Scott River
PDF
This project utilized Onset Hobo Temp electronic units to monitor water temperatures at selected sites in the Scott River and selected tributaries of the Scott River Watershed. Data was collected at various sites beginning in May 1997 and continued through October 1997. Data was entered into the Klamath River Information System. Figures were then compiled from data sets for comparison of water temperatures at these various sites. Baseline information was collected to add to the collective knowledge of the Scott River temperature regime. In the future, a comprehensive analysis of data collected by all cooperating groups (US Forest Service, large timberland owners, schools, Siskiyou RCD/Scott River CRMP) is expected to bring the collection efforts from baseline monitoring to trend monitoring of critical areas.
Laurie Bundy
SRCD
57
10/11/1998
Assessment of Fall Agriculture Irrigation Water Conservation Potential in the Scott Valley
PDF
Irrigation of alfalfa and pasture requires large quantities of water and is sometimes considered a contributor to low flows in the Scott River. A 3-year study was conducted to evaluate the potential for agriculture water conservation in Scott Valley. The effect of irrigation termination date on forage production was evaluated to determine how late in the season irrigation is needed. The soil moisture status of several irrigated pasture and alfalfa fields was monitored weekly for the duration of the growing season using resistance blocks and a neutron probe. This permitted an evaluation of the adequacy of current irrigation practices. The different irrigation cut-off treatments had a profound effect on soil moisture levels. However, only the early irrigation cut-off treatments, July to mid August, caused an appreciable reduction in alfalfa yield. There was no need to irrigate after the final alfalfa cutting for the soil type studied. The date of the final irrigation of the season had no effect on alfalfa yield the following season. Late-season (October) pasture yield was affected by irrigation termination date. There was little to no difference in yield between the latest two irrigation cut-off dates. Pasture species were more sensitive to moisture stress than was alfalfa. The earliest irrigation cut-off date, August 3'd, killed some grass plants and reduced yield the following year. The monitoring study indicated that soil moisture content fluctuated considerably during the growing season. Periods of low soil moisture were generally associated with harvests, a time period when fields cannot be irrigated. The soil moisture content was typically lowest in mid to late summer between irrigations and, in the case of alfalfa, in fall after the final harvest of the season was made.
Steve B. Orloff
Cooperative Extension University of California Siskiyou County
52
01/07/2001
Scott River Monitoring Plan: Sediment Sampling & Analysis - 2000
PDF
This analysis of the 2000 sediment sampling data is the sediment portion of the “Scott River Monitoring Plan” grant by the California Dept. of Fish and Game to the Siskiyou Resource Conservation District (RCD) and the Scott River Watershed CRMP (now Council). The objective of this grant is to “implement a basin-wide monitoring plan over three years to ensure continuous monitoring and assessment of completed projects.”
Sari Sommarstrom
SRCD, SRWC
50
08/02/2002
SRCD Scott River Adult Coho Spawning Ground Surveys 2001-2002 Season
PDF
This project began as a community, volunteer effort to observe and document an exceptional event. Conditions were right this year for the coho salmon that came all the way up the Klamath River, then up the Scott River over sixty miles to spawn and conditions were right for viewing them. A concerted effort was made to bring all interested and responsible parties together in order to begin to understand the rhythms and complexities of the coho salmon in our watershed. Working together we tried to cover as much area as possible and to share our findings with each other. What we have learned is just the beginning.
Sue Maurer
SRCD
122
13/06/2002
2002 Adult Steelhead Spawning Report - Scott River Tributaries
PDF
Steelhead redd surveys were conducted between 3/21/02 and 5/6/02 on six tributaries within the middle Klamath region. The goal of the SRAMP was to make presence or absence spawning observations, to determine run timing and relative trends over time of the adult steelhead trout. These six streams were surveyed in 2001 and were selected because of the following factors: accessibility because of public land, they were representative of each sub-basin and they had adequate flow. The Shasta sub-basin did not have a suitable tributary, thus was not represented in the survey.
Sue Mauer
USFS
17
01/12/2002
Streambank Soil Bioengineering Field Guide for Low Precipitation Areas
PDF
This Streambank Soil Bioengineering Field Guide is intended as a pocket field guide for many of the soil bioengineering treatments that are used to reduce streambank erosion. It has been prepared for use in the Riparian Ecology and Restoration Workshop which focuses on many of the popular streambank soil bioengineering treatments which are used in drier areas of the American West. This field guide incorporates a general discussion on riparian zones, plant materials selection criteria, and streambank soil bioengineering treatments including installation guidelines and materials requirements.
Chris Hoag, Jon Fripp
NRCS
63
31/12/2002
SRCD Annual Newsletter - 2002
PDF
SRCD Annual Report & Newsletter
SRCD
SRCD
4
01/01/2003
Stream Inventory Report: Rail Creek
PDF
A stream inventory was conducted during the summer of2002 on Rail Creek. The survey began 11,764 feet (2.23 mile) above the confluence with the East Fork Scott River and extended upstream 0.2 miles. The Rail Creek inventory was conducted in two parts: habitat inventory and biological inventory. The objective of the habitat inventory was to document the habitat available to anadromous salmonids in Rail Creek. The objective of the biological inventory was to document the presence and distribution of juvenile salmonid species. The objective of this report is to document the current habitat conditions and recommend options for the potential enhancement of habitat for Chinook salmon, coho salmon, and steelhead trout. Recommendations for habitat improvement activities are based upon target habitat values suitable for salmonids in California's north coast streams.
Unknown
SRCD
30
01/01/2003
Stream Inventory Report: Grouse Creek
PDF
A stream inventory was conducted during the summer of 2002 on Grouse Creek. The survey began at the confluence with the East Fork Scott River and extended upstream 2.41 miles. The Grouse Creek inventory was conducted in two parts: habitat inventory and biological inventory. The objective of the habitat inventory was to document the habitat available to anadromous salmonids in Grouse Creek. The objective of the biological inventory was to document the presence and distribution of juvenile salmonid species. The objective of this report is to document the current habitat conditions and recommend options for the potential enhancement of habitat for Chinook salmon, coho salmon, and steelhead trout. Recommendations for habitat improvement activities are based upon target habitat values suitable for salmonids in California's north coast streams.
Unknown
SRCD
28
01/01/2003
Stream Inventory Report: Kangaroo Creek
PDF
A stream inventory was conducted during the summer of2002 on Kangaroo Creek. The survey began 7,334 feet (1.39 miles) above the confluence with the East Fork Scott River and extended upstream I.35 miles. The Kangaroo Creek inventory was conducted in two parts: habitat inventory and biological inventory. The objective of the habitat inventory was to document the habitat available to anadromous salmonids in Kangaroo Creek. The objective of the biological inventory was to document the presence and distribution of juvenile salmonid species. The objective of this report is to document the current habitat conditions and recommend options for the potential enhancement of habitat for Chinook salmon, coho salmon, and steelhead trout. Recommendations for habitat improvement activities are based upon target habitat values suitable for salmonids in California's north coast streams.
Unknown
SRCD
36
01/01/2003
Stream Inventory Report: Cabin Meadows Creek
PDF
A stream inventory was conducted during the summer of 2002 on Cabin Meadows Creek. The survey began 2,477 feet (0.47 mile) above the confluence with Houston Creek and extended upstream 1. 75 miles. Cabin Meadows Creek inventory was conducted in two parts: habitat inventory and biological inventory. The objective of the habitat inventory was to document the habitat available to anadromous salmonids in Cabin Meadows Creek. The objective of the biological inventory was to document the presence and distribution of juvenile salmon.id species. The objective of this report is to document the current habitat conditions and recommend options for the potential enhancement of habitat for Chinook salmon, coho salmon, and steelhead trout. Recommendations for habitat improvement activities are based upon target habitat values suitable for salmonids in California's north coast streams.
Unknown
SRCD
34
01/01/2003
Stream Inventory Report: Houston Creek
PDF
A stream inventory was conducted during the summer of2002 on Houston Creek. The survey began 5,229 feet (0.99 mile) above the confluence with the East Fork Scott River and extended upstream 1. 72 miles. The Houston Creek inventory was conducted in two parts: habitat inventory and biological inventory. The objective of the habitat inventory was to document the habitat available to anadromous salmonids in Houston Creek. The objective of the biological inventory was to document the presence and distribution of juvenile salmonid species. The objective of this report is to document the current habitat conditions and recommend options for the potential enhancement of habitat for Chinook salmon, coho salmon, and steelhead trout. Recommendations for habitat improvement activities are based upon target habitat values suitable for salmonids in California's north coast streams.
Unknown
SRCD
34
01/05/2003
Finley Ranch Enhancement Project
PDF
Erosion mitigation project on the Finley Ranch near Fort Jones, CA.
Gary Black
SRCD
8
08/05/2003
SRCD Scott River Adult Coho Spawning Ground Surveys 2002-2003 Season
PDF
As in 2001-2002, this project was essentially unfunded and was accomplished in a cooperative effort by individuals from severaI agencies and organizations and with the cooperation of many local landowners. A concerted effort was made to bring all interested and responsible parties together in order to continue to learn about the complexities of the coho salmon population in the Scott River watershed. Working together, we tried to cover as much area as possible and to share our findings with each other. It is our hope that we can continue to learn together, to build trust and reduce fear and polarization through acquiring knowledge and by workng together toward solutions.
Sue Maurer
SRCD
81
01/11/2003
Loose Rock Weir, Irrigation Water Conveyance
PDF
The Farmers Ditch diverts water out of the Scott River (RM 51 ). The Farmers Ditch is the second largest diversion in the watershed (36.00 cfs). Site is located at confluence of Sugar Creek and Scott River. This is also the take-out of the Farmers Ditch diversion. It is more particularly located in Sec 1 T.40N R.9W or 122 52' 30" N 41 22' 30" W latitude and longitude. The current method of diversion is to construct a gravel/rock dam using bed load from the channel. The gravel dam is a fish passage barrier when fully installed as the dam extends across the active channel. The intent of the project is to move the diversion up stream and install a vortex boulder weir to replace the gravel dam. Furthermore, we propose to replace the existing fish screen with one that meets CDFG/NOAA screening criteria and protect the diversion from high flows with a headgate and bulkhead structure. This effort is in cooperation with the NRCS and the CDFG. A majority of the cost share is provided by NRCS.
SRCD
31/12/2003
SRCD Annual Newsletter - 2003
PDF
SRCD Annual Report & Newsletter for the year of 2003.
SRCD
SRCD
4
01/01/2004
Scott River Mainstem - Horn Lane to above Fay Lane
PDF
This portion of the Scott River mainstem includes the area from the Hom Lane Bridge outside of Etna to 1.1 miles above the Fay Lane Bridge, 6 miles north of Callahan. (See Map #4) This reach is immediately downstream of the tailings piles north of Callahan. The tailings are six miles of dredger piles created by the Yuba dredge in the 1930's. Legal description of this reach is T41N R9W Sec 35 and T42N R9W Sec 2, 11, 13, 14,24. Elevation ranges from 2800 to 2860 feet. This section is broken out into three stream reaches based on Channel Typing. Reach I (Scott 1) is from the Horn Lane Bridge to the Scott Valley Irrigation District Ditch (SVID). Reach 2 (Scott 2) is SVID to the mouth of French Creek. Reach 3 (Scott 3) is from the mouth of French Creek upstream to approximately 5,808 feet above the Fay Lane Bridge. Tributaries include McConaughey Gulch ( ephemeral) and French Creek.
Unknown
SRCD
12
01/06/2004
Water Master Plan Report for the City of Etna Water System
PDF
The water supply for the City of Etna is a diversion from Etna Creek about 2 miles upstream of the City. The watershed upstream of the diversion is primarily undeveloped, resulting in generally high quality water most of the time. The diversion is at an elevation that allows gravity flow to the City, through the water treatment facilities and into the City's reservoirs. The reservoirs are located on the hillside above the town, providing gravity flow to the City distribution system and customers. The entirely gravity system is reliable and economical to operate. Current water supply requirements were estimated to average about 65,000 gpd (gallons per day) and peak at 150,000 gpd. The required water supply is projected to increase to an average of79,000 gpd and peak of 183,000 gpd by the year 2024, the end of the 20 year planning period selected for this study. Those values include a I 0% allowance for losses in the distribution system and a 25% loss to filter backwashing at the treatment plant. The City has a water right allowing diversion of 2.40 cfs (cubic feet per second) or 1,550,00 gpd, well in excess of the projected demands. The minimum flow available for diversion from Etna Creek during late summer, however, is estimated to average only 0.38 cfs or 243,000 gpd. It is estimated that the flow will be less than the year 2024 maximum day demand once every 2 or 3 years and below the year 2024 average day demand once every 25 years, based on a 7 day minimum flow. Those estimates are based on considerable extrapolation of the limited available data, but they are consistent with reported experience. Further data collection and study is recommended to better define the minimum available flow from Etna Creek.
Various
Oscar Larson & Associates
78
08/10/2004
SRCD Scott River Adult Coho Spawning Ground Surveys 2003-2004 Season
PDF
Adult coho spawning ground surveys were completed in the Scott River watershed from December 2003 through January 15th, 2004. Surveys were completed on the Scott River mainstem, East and South Fork Scott River, Rail Creek, Kangaroo Creek, Sugar Creek, Wildcat Creek, French Creek, Miners Creek, Shackleford Creek, Shackleford-Mill Creek, Kidder Creek, Canyon Creek, Kelsey Creek, and Mill Creek (Scott Bar). Flow barriers, and lack of access prevented some reaches from being surveyed.
Danielle Quigley
SRCD
27
31/05/2005
SRCD Scott River Adult Coho Spawning Ground Surveys 2004-2005 Season
PDF
Adult coho spawning ground surveys were completed in a total of 47.20 stream miles (44.45 miles of tributaries, and 2.75 miles of mainstem) in the Scott River Watershed. Live coho salmon were spotted in the Scott River as early as October 22nd, 2004, with radiotag verification on October 26th, 2004. The survey season was November 16th, 2004– January 14th, 2005. Total counts for the season were 960 redds, 569 Carcasses, and 1577 live fish counts (although some live fish were likely counted twice during weekly surveys).
Danielle Quigley
SRCD
148
01/06/2005
Fish Screen Maintenance Manual
PDF
Fish Screen Maintenance Manual from the year 2005.
SRCD
SRCD
14
01/10/2005
Initial Phase of the Scott River Watershed Council Strategic Action Plan
PDF
The Scott River Watershed Council (SRWC) has developed this plan for the Scott River watershed for the purpose of cooperatively establishing a common strategy for restoration and management actions. Thus, the Scott River Watershed Strategic Action Plan (SAP) will form the basis for setting priorities for future projects and practices to be supported by the SRWC, the communities within the watershed, and the many funding sources.
Rhonda Muse
SRCD, SRWC
258
01/01/2006
Stream Inventory Report: Sugar Creek
PDF
A stream inventory was conducted from 8/16/2005 to 8/17/2005 on Sugar Creek, Siskiyou County. The survey began 160 feet above the confluence with Scott River and extended upstream 3.5 miles. The objective of the habitat inventory was to document the habitat available to anadromous salmonids within the surveyed sections of Sugar Creek. The objective of this report is to document the current habitat conditions and recommend options for the potential enhancement of habitat for Chinook salmon, coho salmon, and steelhead trout. Recommendations for habitat improvement activities are based upon target habitat values suitable for salmonids in California's north coast streams.
Unknown
SRCD
38
01/01/2006
SRCD Scott River Adult Coho Spawning Ground Surveys 2005-2006 Season
PDF
The 2005-2006 Adult Coho Spawning Ground Surveys began in the Scott River and tributaries on November 11th, 2005. Surveys were formally initiated at this time because adult Chinook were observed spawning in Shackleford Creek on November 9th, 2005. Coho surveys were started in an effort to positively identify Chinook redds versus coho redds in areas where the two species were using the same spawning grounds. Adult coho spawning ground surveys were completed in a total of 34.10.85 miles; 4.75 miles of mainstem, and 29.35 miles of tributary.
Danielle Quigley
SRCD
51
01/05/2006
Scott River Summer Habitat Utilization Study
PDF
Direct observation surveys were performed throughout the Scott Valley and tributaries in the low flow period of 2005, to observe the distribution and density of the strong cohort of rearing juvenile coho salmon.
Erich Yokel
SRCD
69
19/07/2006
SRCD Scott River Fall Chinook Spawning Ground Surveys 2005 Season
PDF
Spawning ground surveys for Salmon and Scott River 2005 Season
Tami Clayton
SRCD
39
31/03/2007
SRCD Scott River Adult Coho Spawning Ground Surveys 2006-2007 Season
PDF
Adult Coho Spawning Ground Surveys were completed in a total of 43.65 miles of the Scott River mainstem and tributaries; 4.75 miles of mainstem were surveyed, and 38.90 miles of tributaries. Surveys were completed between November 14th and January 12th. Flow conditions during December were too high to survey during the second and fourth weeks.
Danielle Quigley
SRCD
24
07/11/2007
Scott River Flow Measurements & Report – Evaluation of gaining and losing reaches of the Scott River
PDF
Stream discharge measurements were taken at nine locations on the Scott River a total of 8 times in 2006 and 7 times in 2007. 2006 was an above average water year and 2007 was a below average water year. Effort was made to perform this work in 2007 in order to capture and characterize this low base flow.
Danielle Yokel, Erich Yokel
SRCD
15
01/09/2008
SRCD Scott River Adult Coho Spawning Ground Surveys 2007-2008 Season
PDF
In 2007, adult coho spawning ground surveys were continued in the Scott River Watershed in order to expand current knowledge of the endangered fishery. Similar to 2004, 2007 marked the return of the strong coho brood year. Thus, surveys were completed wherever access, staffing, and environmental variables would permit. A total of 45.95 miles were surveyed (6.45 miles on the mainstem and 3 7 .5 miles on tributaries). Surveys consisted of trained crews walking established reaches either instream or on the bank in order to collect information concerning lives, carcasses, and redds.
Brannon Walsh
SRCD
42
01/01/2009
Monitoring Report - 2008 Scott River Water Trust
PDF
The Scott River Water Trust (Water Trust) performed a series of transactions with adjudicated water users in the Scott River Watershed to forbear all or part of their diversion in the summer and fall of 2008. The Siskiyou Resource Conservation District (RCD) staff monitored water quality (temperature), quantity (stream discharge), fish habitat (pool volume), and fish presence (direct observation) before and after most of these transactions to document the effect on the instream habitat quality. The RCD performed monitoring activities with the Water Trust during the summer of 2007 and this initial experience was used to direct a more comprehensive monitoring program in 2008. A variety of monitoring protocols were used to attempt to document the effect of the leased water on water quality, quantity and fish habitat. The main goal of this effort was to monitor the effectiveness of the Water Trust at a project level to improve the quality and quantity of available suitable aquatic habitat. The monitoring effort utilized protocols to monitor the physical habitat of the stream and documented the presence of the target species (coho and Chinook salmon) in the habitats affected by the transactions. The main objective of the monitoring effort was to answer the following questions while learning more about the hydrology and instream habitat availability in the Scott River Watershed.
Erich Yokel
SRCD
48
17/09/2009
Scott River Riparian Analysis
PDF
It is the goal of this analysis to evaluate the effectiveness of existing riparian protection and enhancement projects throughout the Scott Valley. This evaluation of previous effort is used to generate a series of recommended restoration and protection techniques that have worked in different areas of the watershed.
SRCD
56
01/01/2010
Scott River Spawning Gravel Evaluation and Enhancement Plan
PDF
The Scott River Spawning Gravel Enhancement Plan (Plan) was developed through a cooperative effort from Cramer Fish Sciences, The Siskiyou Resource Conservation District, Philip Williams & Associates, California Department of Fish and Game, and the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission. The document provides a description of the scientific approach used to identify salmonid spawning habitat conditions and prioritize potential enhancement locations and the results of the application of this approach on the Scott River Watershed. The broad-level study approach has been designed to use best available data and field sampling to assess watershed processes and determine potential impacts to salmonid spawning and incubation habitat. The Plan provides watershed stakeholders with a framework for identifying, quantifying and qualifying spawning habitat for anadromous salmonids within the Scott River Basin and for prioritizing and strategizing the protection and maintenance of quality habitat as well as enhancement of sub-optimal habitat. The Plan is programmatic in nature and accomplishes the following: - Identifies the range of general salmonid spawning habitat conditions (i.e., substrate quantity/quality, morphologic features) that exists in key reaches of the watershed. - Provides information on the most effectivemethods of spawning gravel enhancement currently used. - Provides a basic monitoring and prioritization plan for the quantity and quality of salmonid spawning habitat (emphasizing coho salmon) within the watershed. Note: the Plan can be used not only to prioritize areas with the greatest potential for gravel enhancement but also for identifying areas with greatest habitat quantity and quality presently. - Provides a simple tool for measuring potential, relative change in embryo survival from enhancement actions within the watershed.
Cramer Fish Sciences
SRCD
116
01/02/2010
SRCD Scott River Adult Coho Spawning Ground Surveys 2008-2009 Season
PDF
In 2008-2009, adult coho spawning ground surveys were continued in the Scott River Watershed in order to expand current knowledge of the endangered fishery. A total of 33.75 miles were surveyed (15.85 miles on the mainstem and 17.90 miles on tributaries).
Brannon Walsh, Danielle Yokle
SRCD
18
03/03/2010
SRCD Scott River Adult Coho Spawning Ground Surveys 2009-2010 Season
PDF
Adult coho spawning ground surveys were completed in the Scott River watershed between December 10th, 2009 and January 14th, 2010. A total of 32.37 miles of survey were completed, 20.82 miles of tributary and 11.55 miles of mainstem Scott River. Adult coho access was limited by low flows, periods of frozen water, and beaver dams for varying periods during the spawning season. A total of five live coho, two coho carcasses, and six redds were observed during the Spawning Ground Surveys. The adult counting facility operated by the California Dept of Fish and Game counted 81 adult coho passing through the weir.
SRCD
21
01/01/2011
Stream discharge gauging in the Scott River – WY2009 – WY2010
PDF
Two stream discharge gages were established in the main stem Scott River late July 2008. These gages were established to refine the understanding of the Scott River’s water balance and supply and further the investigations into the gaining and losing reaches and groundwater-surface water interactions in the main stem. The gages were not operated for the entire water year due to concerns about high winter flows and channel stability. The monitoring program successfully documented the period approaching low flow and base flow conditions at the two sites during WY2009. The Scott River was disconnected at both locations during the late summer and early fall of 20009. The period in which connectivity was returned in mid October 2009 following a significant precipitation event was documented. Comparison of the discharge timing and magnitude and daily accumulated volume of water (acre feet per day) documented at these two locations with the locations monitored by the USGS and the California Dept. of Water Resources provides a case study of a run off event that restores connectivity throughout the Scott River.
Erich Yokel, Danielle Yokel
SRCD
33
31/03/2011
SRCD Scott River Fall Chinook Spawning Ground Surveys 2010 Season
PDF
The 2010 cooperative survey began October 111 and ended on December 2nd . There was a storm and high water event during October that forced the cancellation of surveys on both systems; and due to discharges subsequently remaining too high for safe navigation throughout the remaining of the season, Salmon River surveys upon the mainstem and forks were irregular. However, the high water did provide an opportunity to shift surveys to include multiple tributary systems.
Maija Meneks
SRCD
37
01/04/2011
SRCD Scott River Adult Coho Spawning Ground Surveys 2010-2011 Season
PDF
In 2010-2011, adult coho spawning ground surveys were completed in the Scott River Watershed in order to continue to further existing knowledge of the distribution and timing of coho salmon. A total of 42.0 miles were surveyed (9.10 miles on the mainstem and 32.90 miles on tributaries). Surveys consisted of trained crews walking established reaches either instream or on the bank in order to collect information on lives, carcasses, and redds.
Danielle Yokel
SRCD
26
01/03/2012
SRCD Scott River Adult Coho Spawning Ground Surveys 2011-2012 Season
PDF
In 2011, adult coho spawning ground surveys were completed in the Scott River Watershed in order to continue to further existing knowledge of the distribution and timing of coho salmon. A total of 21.4 miles were surveyed (3.10 miles on the mainstem and 18.3 miles on tributaries).
Tom Franklin
SRCD
28
30/03/2012
SRCD Scott River Fall Chinook Spawning Ground Surveys 2011 Season
PDF
5493 fish returned for the 2011 season.
Maija Meneks
SRCD
57
17/06/2013
SRCD Scott River Fall Chinook Spawning Ground Surveys 2012 Season
PDF
4390 fish were counted in the 2012 season.
Maija Meneks
SRCD
27
12/07/2013
SRCD Scott River Adult Coho Spawning Ground Surveys 2012-2013 Season
PDF
Adult coho salmon spawning ground surveys were conducted between November 20th, 2012 and January 10th, 2013. During the survey a total of six (6) adult coho salmon carcasses and 24 redds were observed. Spawning was observed in a total of six tributary locations including the South Fork Scott River, Sugar Creek, French Creek, Miners Creek, Shackleford Creek and Mill Creek.
Danielle Yokel
SRCD
32
23/08/2013
Scott River/French Creek Field Note 8-23-13
PDF
On 8-23-13 a snorkel survey was conducted in the north fork of French Creek. Access for this survey, which took place on Timber Products property, was arranged by Preston Harris with the Scott River Water Trust.
Chris Adams
CDFW
3
01/01/2014
Scott River Groundwater Study Plan Implementation: Mainstem Scott River Streamflow gaging Water Years 2011-2013
PDF
The primary purpose of this streamflow data collection effort is to identify the summer water supply in the Scott River. Winter run-off events can exceed the ability to measure discharge, remove equipment from the river, and top the banks of the river. The summer data collected under this project is valuable for developing an understanding of the water supply in the Scott River, and the interaction of surface water and groundwater in the Scott River Valley. Flow data in the mainstem Scott River is collected primarily between June and November, as this is the period when the river if wadeable for discharge measurements. This project collected streamflow data during the summer low flow period of 2011-2013, and captured water supply conditions in a wet and two dry (back to back) years. Additionally, extended low flow conditions caused by drought allowed for data collection at two locations through the winter of 2014. All data collected has been provided to U.C. Davis for incorporation into their Scott Valley Hydrologic Model. This data will be utilized to validate the UC Davis Model, which will be used to explore various water supply management scenarios developed by the Scott Valley Groundwater Advisory Committee.
Unknown
SRCD
21
31/03/2014
Reconnaissance of Salmonid Redd Abundance and Juvenile Salmonid Spatial Structure in the Smith River with Emphasis on Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch)
PDF
We investigated two essential population viability metrics of salmonids in the Smith River basin (Oregon and California), with ESA listed coho salmon as the focal species. First, we monitored adult salmonid escapement and distribution for two consecutive years (2011‐2013) using live fish, carcass, and redd counts as defined in California’s Coastal Salmonid Monitoring Plan. Second, we developed a new protocol for monitoring the summer spatial structure of juvenile salmonids and adult coastal cutthroat trout during the summers of 2012 and 2013 using multiple‐pass snorkel surveys in an occupancy modeling framework.
Justin M. Garwood, Monty D. Larson
CDFW
71
01/04/2014
SRCD Scott River Adult Coho Spawning Ground Surveys 2013-2014 Season
PDF
Adult coho salmon spawning ground surveys were conducted between November 20th, 2013 and January 27th 2014. However, low flow conditions in the Scott River throughout the spawning season created temporal and spatial overlap of Chinook and coho spawning. Coho were observed spawning in the Scott River at various locations between November 21st 2013 and February 7th 2014 (pers. Comm Morgan Knechtle, landowner observations).
Danielle Yokel
SRCD
27
26/06/2014
Scott River Watershed Restoration Strategy & Schedule
PDF
This document is intended to provide the local community with a tool to leverage funding for high priority restoration locations, as well as document the extent of riparian restoration implemented to date. An additional purpose is to identify the limitation to riparian restoration on the Scott River, given the current hydrologic, economic, and permitting restraints.
Various
SRCD, SRWC
310
30/06/2014
SRCD Scott River Fall Chinook Spawning Ground Surveys 2013 Season
PDF
Salmon and Scott River 2013 Season Salmon Studies.
Maija Meneks
SRCD
60
01/08/2014
Shasta and Scott River Juvenile Salmonid Outmigrant Study, 2014 - Final Report
PDF
From January through June of 2014, rotary traps were operated on the Shasta and Scott rivers to produce weekly estimates of the number of all age classes of juvenile salmonids emigrating to the Klamath River. The Juvenile Salmonid Outmigrant Study is part of the ongoing Anadromous Fisheries Resource Assessment and Monitoring Program (AFRAMP) study on the Shasta and Scott Rivers in Siskiyou County, California. 2014 was the 15th consecutive year of this monitoring. Using methods described by Carlson et al. (1998), weekly trap efficiencies and population estimates were produced. . Established age-length cutoffs for each species were used to determine fish age. In-stream conditions such as flow and water temperature were also monitored. Weekly estimates for the smolt class of all species were compared to show multi-year population trends. Using Shasta River multi-year seasonal production estimates and coho salmon returning to the Shasta River, adult survival and smolt production estimates were calculated for Shasta River coho. It was estimated that for the period sampled in 2014, a total of 4,744,838 0+ Chinook, 304 1+ Chinook, 10,752 0+ coho, 850 1+ coho, 28,414 0+ steelhead, 908 1+ steelhead, 12,347 2+ steelhead, and 1,334 3+ steelhead emigrated from the Shasta River. It was estimated for this same sample period that 423,085 0+ Chinook, 760 1+ Chinook, 16,962 0+ coho, 5,708 1+ coho, 7,932 0+ steelhead, 145,605 1+ steelhead, 3,513 2+ steelhead, and 16 (actual number caught) 3+ steelhead emigrated from the Scott River.
Amy Debrick, Steven Stenhouse
CDFW
94
22/12/2014
Scott River Riparian Restoration Project
PDF
The goal of this project was to reduce in-stream sediment and temperature loads in the Scott River by stabilizing actively eroding banks and enhancing the riparian corridor.
Preston Harris, Lindsay Magranet, Danielle Yokel
SRCD
26
01/03/2015
SRCD Scott River Fall Chinook Spawning Ground Surveys 2014 Season
PDF
RCD crews conducted Chinook spawning ground surveys from October 28th though December 2nd 2014. This included a minimum of bi-weekly surveys of Index Reaches 12 through 15 and sections of Reach 16 as landowner access permitted. Surveys were also completed on French Creek, Sugar Creek, Shackleford Creek, Mill Creek and the East Fork of the Scott River.
Lindsay Magranet
SRCD
8
01/04/2015
SRCD Scott River Adult Coho Spawning Ground Surveys 2014-2015 Season
PDF
Spawning ground surveys were conducted by the Siskiyou Resource Conservation District from November 14th 2014 to February 4th 2015 across Scott Valley stream reaches to determine the distribution of coho salmon spawning in the watershed and inform related management decisions over the following year.
Lindsay Magranet
SRCD
25
01/08/2015
Cooperative Report of the Scott River Coho Salmon Rescue and Relocation Effort: 2014 Drought Emergency
PDF
An extreme drought in the 2014 water year set the stage for the largest scale rescue and relocation effort of juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) in the history of the California Dept. of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW): an estimated 116,000 coho. Sharing how this complicated effort was accomplished by a diverse array of participants under trying conditions is a primary focus of this report. Recommendations are also made about what went well and what could be done better, in case similar emergency projects need to be implemented in the future.
Various
CDFW, NOAA, SRWT, SRCD, USFS
60
01/11/2015
Sugar Creek Beaver Pond Juvenile Coho Salmon Monitoring Study, Siskiyou County, California 2011-2012
PDF
Sugar Creek Beaver Po11dJ uvenile Coho Salmon Monitoring Study, Siskiyou County, 2011-2012 presents important information for understanding stream alterations caused by beaver dams and ponds in relation to coho salmon (Oncorliynclms kisutch) recovery in the Scott River watershed and the Southern Oregon Northern California Coho (SONCC) evolutionary significant unit (ESU). The North American beaver (Castor canadensis) was widely abundant in Scott Valley, in fact Hudson's Bay Company trappers referred to it as Beaver Valley. Anthropogenic impacts, including water diversions, beaver trapping, and gravel dredging highly impacted the river's ecological systems and natural flow during the 19th and 20th centuries, which contributed to the decline of coho salmon. After coho salmon were slate listed in 2005, the Siskiyou Resource Conservation District along with federal and state partners implemented restoration projects, including screening water diversions to help protect juvenile fish and increase returning adults. Despite restoration efforts, the numbers of returning adults continued to decline. One of the main reasons for the recent decline was lack of surface flow, especially during irrigation season. Coho salmon usually exhibits a three year cycle that requires at least one year juvenile rearing in fresh water. Beaver dams hold back water that can provide habitat for summer and winter rearing when other parts of the stream may be dry. This report describes data collected during the 2011-2012 juvenile coho rearing season. In particular, the author describes: • Date tagged and fork length relationships before and after the pond freezing. • Underwater observations in habitat affected by the presence of the dam. • Timing of juveniles out-migrating from Sugar Creek into Scott River and the relationship with high flow events.
Mary Olswang
CDFW
21
08/06/2016
CDFW Scott River Salmon Studies 2015
PDF
CDFW Scott River Salmon report from the year 2015.
Morgan Knechtle, Diana Chesney
CDFW
29
31/01/2017
SRCD Scott River Fall Chinook Spawning Ground Surveys 2016 Season
PDF
RCD crews initiated spawning ground surveys in the Scott River Valley on October 12th 2016 (Appendix A).
Lindsay Magranet
SRCD
12
06/02/2017
Interim Instream Flow Criteria For the Protection of Fishery Resources in the Scott River Watershed, Siskiyou County
PDF
This document describes the methods and results of an analysis using historical flow data and regional regression relationships to develop interim instream flow criteria suitable for anadromous fish in the Scott River watershed in Siskiyou County. The Scott River watershed provides aquatic habitat for four species of anadromous fish; Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), Coho Salmon (O. kisutch), steelhead trout (O. mykiss), and Pacific Lamprey (Lampetra tridentata). Specifically, the Scott River is one of the most important Coho Salmon spawning and rearing tributaries in the Klamath River watershed. Instream flow requirements can be generated from flow standard setting techniques or from the results of site specific studies. The interim instream flow criteria presented for the Scott River were developed using flow standard setting techniques. Stream flow standards derived from standard setting techniques are designed to identify the environmental resource in need of flow protection, identify biologically significant criterion that can be used to measure potential flow related impacts, and specify the amount of flow required to protect the resource. Most individual standards evaluate only one or more, but not all the criterion needed to fully evaluate the flow needs of an aquatic species. This limitation can lead to prescribing a single minimum threshold or “flat-line” affect (Poff et al. 1997). The seasonal and inter-annual variability in the hydrograph must be maintained to protect stream ecology and provide an ecosystem based standard (Annear 2004). To account for the seasonal and the inter-annual hydrologic variability of the Scott River, the Department applied a detailed hydrologic analysis along with application of three standard setting methods to evaluate the life history flow needs of salmonids in the Scott River near Fort Jones. Adult fish passage was estimated using the equation developed by R2 Resources (R2 2008) for the State Water Resources Control Board’s (SWRCB) North Coast Instream Flow Policy (SWRCB 2014), spawning and juvenile rearing were evaluated using the Hatfield and Bruce regional equations (Hatfield and Bruce 2000), and the results were adjusted monthly based on estimates of unimpaired hydrology using Tessmann’s adaptation (Tessmann 1980) of the Tennant or Montana Method (Tennant 1975).
Unknown
CDFW
29
01/06/2017
SRCD Scott River Adult Coho Spawning Ground Surveys 2016-2017 Season
PDF
A total of 95 coho redds were recorded by surveyors on the Scott River mainstem and the following tributaries (from north to south): Shackleford Creek and its tributary Mill Creek, Patterson Creek, French Creek and its tributary Miners Creek, Sugar Creek and the East Fork Scott River. A total of 22 coho carcasses were recovered, sexed, measured and sampled.
Lindsay Magranet
SRCD
28
31/01/2018
SRCD Scott River Fall Chinook Spawning Ground Surveys 2017 Season
PDF
The RCD initiated spawning ground surveys through the Index Reaches of the Scott River Valley on October 17th.
Lindsay Magranet
SRCD
19
12/04/2018
Public Records Request Policy
PDF
N/A.
SRCD
SRCD
8
20/06/2018
CDFW Scott River Salmon Studies 2017
PDF
CDFW Scott River Salmon report from the year 2017.
Morgan Knechtle, Domenic Giudice
CDFW
27
25/06/2018
Avian Resources Report for the Scott River Streambank Bioengineering Project
PDF
The purpose of this Avian Resources Report is to review the potential impacts of the proposed Scott River Bioengineering Project (Project) on avian species as required by the California Environmental Quality Act. The resources considered in this report include Federal or State (California) listed Threatened, Endangered, or Candidate species and their critical habitats. The Siskiyou Resource Conservation District is the lead partner on this project.
David Johnson
USFW
14
31/03/2020
SRCD Scott River Fall Chinook Spawning Ground Surveys 2019 Season
PDF
The RCD initiated spawning ground surveys through the Index Reaches of the Scott River Valley on October 16, 2019.
Lindsay Magranet, Emma Morris, Chris Voigt
SRCD
9
01/05/2020
SRCD Scott River Adult Coho Spawning Ground Surveys 2019-2020 Season
PDF
Spawning ground surveys were conducted by the Siskiyou Resource Conservation District from December 10th, 2019 to January 24th, 2020 to determine the distribution of coho salmon spawning in the watershed and inform related management decisions over the following year. A total of 23.7 river miles were surveyed (3.9 river miles on the mainstem and 19.8 river miles on tributaries).
Lindsay Magranet
SRCD
28
11/06/2020
2020-2024 Long Range Plan
PDF
This five-year plan will be the guiding document to determine the priorities for the Siskiyou Resource Conservation District (RCD) in carrying out its mission statement from 2020 through 2024. The document sets forth the goals related to each priority and lists actions that support those goals.
Lindsay Magranet
SRCD
8
11/06/2020
2020 Annual Plan of Operations
PDF
This document has been developed to propose a plan of activities for completion in 2020 that contribute to the goals outlined in the 2020-2024 Long-Range Plan. The activities listed in this Plan of Operations each relate directly back to an identified action item from the Long-Range Plan.
Lindsay Magranet
SRCD
7
01/02/2021
Scott River Stream Restoration and Sediment Reduction Program Final Report 2017-2021
PDF
Under the Scott River Stream Restoration and Sediment Reduction Program, the SRCD has been working to address sediment and thermal inputs to the Scott River with willing landowners through methods that concurrently enhance habitat for salmonid species in the watershed.
Lindsay Magranet
SRCD
58
01/12/2021
SRCD Scott River Adult Coho Spawning Ground Surveys 2020-2021 Season
PDF
Spawning surveys began on November 25th, 2020, on Reach 9 of the Scott River (between the river’s confluence with Oro Fino Creek and the Meamber Bridge) and continued through January 22nd, 2021.
Chris Voigt
SRCD
29
31/12/2021
CDFW Scott River Salmon Studies 2021
PDF
CDFW Scott Valley Chinook Report Annual Report for 2021.
CDFW
31/03/2022
SRCD Scott River Fall Chinook Spawning Ground Surveys 2021 Season
PDF
SRCD Chinook Spawning Ground Survey Final Report for the year 2021.
Chris Voigt
SRCD
10
01/05/2022
Invasive Plant Management Plan - Scott Watershed
PDF
This Plan is directed at prioritizing, coordinating and strategizing objectives and activities necessary for the prevention, reduction, eradication and control of high priority noxious and invasive plants on private and public lands in the Scott River watershed in order to preserve and improve local biodiversity.
Evan Senf
SRCD
33
15/06/2022
Underwater Camera Sample Footage
Video
Example underwater camera footage. Youngs Dam. Camera is located in the main dam.
Evan Senf
SRCD
12/07/2023
Evaluating the Hydrologic Effects of the 2021–2022 Scott and Shasta Irrigation Curtailments Using Remote Sensing and Streamflow Gages
PDF
To protect fish populations in the Scott and Shasta rivers, California’s State Water Board issued emergency regulations that curtailed agricultural surface water diversions and groundwater pumping beginning in early September 2021 (when irrigation season was nearly over) whenever instream flows dropped below minimum thresholds. Prior to curtailments, in exchange for payments, three Scott Valley ranches voluntarily agreed not to pump groundwater in 2021 from August through November.
J. Eli Asarian
Riverbend Sciences
69
01/10/2023
Stream Inventory Report: East Fork Scott River 2023
PDF
A stream inventory was conducted during 12/12/2022 to 7/31/2023 on East Fork Scott River. The survey began at the confluence with Highway 3 Bridge and extended upstream 2.6 miles. Stream inventories and reports to this report were also completed for one tributary to East Fork Scott River.
Evan Senf
SRCD
36
01/10/2023
Stream Inventory Report: Noyes Valley Creek 2023
PDF
A stream inventory was conducted during 2/10/2023 to 2/20/2023 on Noyes Valley Creek. The survey began at the confluence with East Fork Scott River and extended upstream 1.1 miles. This report is supplemental/in addition to the East Fork report (SRCD 2023).
Evan Senf
SRCD
34
15/10/2023
SRCD Scott River Fall Chinook Spawning Ground Surveys 2022 Season
PDF
SRCD Chinook Spawning Ground Survey Final Report for the year 2022.
Evan Senf, Christina Jankowski
SRCD
8
01/02/2024
SRCD Scott River Adult Coho Spawning Ground Surveys 2022-2023 Season
PDF
Although spawning ground surveys for 2022-2023 were very limited due to budget constraints, they were conducted as possible by the Siskiyou Resource Conservation District from the period of November 20th, 2022, to January 22nd, 2023 to determine the distribution of coho salmon spawning in the watershed and inform related management decisions over the following year. A total of 20.5 river miles were surveyed (12.5 river miles on the mainstem and 8.0 river miles on western tributaries).
Various
SRCD
26
01/02/2024
SRCD Annual Newsletter - 2024
PDF
75th Anniversary Newsletter
Various
SRCD
12
08/03/2024
SRCD Scott River Adult Coho Spawning Ground Surveys 2023-2024 Season
PDF
During the 2023-2024 coho salmon spawning season, staff from the Quartz Valley Indian Reservation (QVIR), Scott River Watershed Council (SRWC) and Siskiyou Resource Conservation District (SRCD) conducted spawning ground surveys on 38.3 miles of 17 streams in the Scott River watershed. Between November 2, 2023 and January 16, 2024, a total of 251 coho salmon redds and 168 carcasses were documented in the cooperative survey effort. The highest concentration of redds per survey mile were found at the Scott River at Sugar Creek Confluence, the Middle French Creek, the Lower and Middle Sugar Creek and the East Fork Scott River at Kangaroo Creek reaches.
Various
SRCD, SRWC
80
29/03/2024
Mainstem Flow and Water Quality Monitoring: Annual Report 2023
PDF
Between June 6th, 2023, and December 31st, 2023, the SRCD team began an ambitious effort to advance the Mainstem Flow and Water Quality Monitoring project. This period saw the successful execution of strategically planned tasks aimed at strengthening our monitoring infrastructure and expanding our dataset to support comprehensive water resource management.
Evan Senf
SRCD
32
01/04/2024
CDFW Scott River Salmon Studies 2020
PDF
CDFW
CDFW
19/04/2024
French Creek Invasive Plant Management Project: Final Report 2024
PDF
Over the two years of the French Creek Invasive Plant Management project, our team has made significant strides in addressing invasive species across 53.752 acres. The first year alone saw 32.71 acres treated, followed by a targeted Year 2 effort that dealt with Dodder (0.002 acres), Yellow Toadflax (0.56 acres), and Spotted Knapweed (20.48 acres), summing up to 21.042 acres for the second year. These efforts were diligently carried out on private lands adjacent to French Creek, in full compliance with Siskiyou County pesticide application regulations. Comprehensive surveys, including areas like the JH Ranch (Scott Valley, CA), confirmed the upstream boundary of the Spotted Knapweed’s reach. This groundwork was not only vital for containment but also instrumental in crafting two successful grant proposals, securing the future of our mitigation and eradication initiatives as well as maintaining the health of the French Creek ecosystem.
Evan Senf
SRCD
6
15/05/2024
Scott River Fall Chinook Spawning Ground Surveys 2023 Season
PDF
The SRCD team initiated the spawning ground surveys on October 6, 2023, covering Index Reaches 8, 9, 13 and 15 on a weekly basis, or as conditions allowed. This monitoring culminated on November 21, 2023, concluding that chinook spawning had tapered off. The 2023 season saw SRCD surveyors documenting occurrences across the surveyed sites (except in the tailings).
Evan Senf, Christina Jankowski
SRCD
22
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